Simple Steps To Better Dental HealthBack
space placeholder.space placeholder
New reviewed by Columbia banner
Molar Uprighting

space placeholder.space placeholder
space placeholder.What Is It?.
space placeholder.What It's Used For.
space placeholder.Preparation.
space placeholder.How It's Done.
space placeholder.Follow-Up.
space placeholder.Risks.
space placeholder.When To Call a Professional.
space placeholder.Additional Info.
space placeholder..
space placeholder

space placeholder
space placeholder.What Is It?
space placeholder

Molar uprighting corrects a tilted molar. Molars are the wide, flat teeth in the back of your mouth. The two teeth in front of the molars are called bicuspids. Adults usually have three molars on each side of the upper and lower jaws. The first two come in at ages 6 and 12. The third molars (wisdom teeth) come in around age 17 or 18.

space placeholder
space placeholder.What It's Used For
space placeholder

If a molar or a second bicuspid is taken out, usually the molar behind it will drift forward into the space. The tooth may lean or tilt. This can cause food to get stuck between your teeth, which can increase your risk of tooth decay or gum disease. Also, when a tooth is leaning over, the force of chewing may push it further out of position. This can destroy the bone in front of the tooth and lead to loss of the tooth.

Through molar uprighting, this leaning tooth can be brought back to its original position. Your dentist often will recommend that this be done before a bridge or implant replaces the missing tooth.

space placeholder
space placeholder.Preparation
space placeholder

Before any treatment begins, your dentist or orthodontist will talk with you about the best treatment for you. He or she will make impressions of your teeth and make plaster casts or models. These are used to make measurements and to plan your treatment. You also will have photos taken of your face and teeth. X-rays will be taken that show all of your teeth and the sides of your head and face. Your dentist or orthodontist will make measurements using the X-ray of the side of your head. This will help determine what is the proper position for the tilted molar, as well as your other teeth.

space placeholder
space placeholder.How It's Done
space placeholder

Some people will need braces. Sometimes a removable appliance similar to a retainer may be used.

Molar uprighting usually takes a few months to a year. The amount of time depends on how severely the tooth is tilted. If other teeth also need to be straightened, treatment may take two years or longer. After the removable appliance or braces are in place, you will need to see the dentist about once a month for adjustments.

Your dentist may wait until all braces or removable appliances are removed before replacing the missing tooth. However, if you will be getting a dental implant, your dentist may want it put in before the appliances are removed. If your missing tooth is not replaced soon after the appliances are removed, you will need a retainer to hold the tilted tooth in the correct position.

space placeholder
space placeholder.Follow-Up
space placeholder

You may feel some discomfort for a few days after the braces or removable appliances are placed. You also may have some discomfort when adjustments are made. If you have braces, the brackets and bands may irritate your tongue, lips or cheeks. The discomfort is usually mild. It can be easily controlled with over-the-counter medicines, such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin and other brand names) or acetaminophen (Tylenol and others). Areas of your mouth may become irritated in the beginning. This usually will disappear after a few days or so. Your orthodontist will give you a soft wax that can be placed over irritating brackets and wires. If irritation or soreness continues beyond a week, call your orthodontist for an appointment.

space placeholder
space placeholder.Risks
space placeholder

The risks of molar uprighting are the same as with any orthodontic procedure. There may be some discomfort. Also, the tooth's roots may become shorter. The risk of this happening is small. Even when it does happen, it usually does not cause problems. On rare occasions, though, treatment may need to be stopped if going forward will make the roots very short. Other risks include tooth decay and gum disease. These can happen more often in people with orthodontic appliances, especially if they don't brush and floss regularly.

space placeholder
space placeholder.When To Call a Professional
space placeholder

Call your dentist or orthodontist if your braces (brackets) break or become loose or if your arch wire is bent or broken. This should be fixed because broken appliances can lengthen treatment time. Also, if something sharp or irritating is bothering your lips, cheeks, tongue or gums, call for an appointment.

space placeholder
space placeholder.Additional Info
space placeholder

American Association of Orthodontists
401 N. Lindbergh Boulevard
St. Louis, MO 63141-7816
Phone: 314-993-1700
Toll-Free: 800- 424-2841
Fax: 314-997-1745
Email: info@aaortho.org
www.aaortho.org

.
.

© 2002-2014 Aetna, Inc. All rights reserved. All information is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions. You should seek prompt medical care for any specific health issues and consult your physician before starting a new fitness regimen. Use of this online service is subject to the disclaimer and the terms and conditions. External website links provided on this site are meant for convenience and for informational purposes only; they do not constitute an endorsement. These external links open in a different window.